WJSHS Course Guide

Please note: Watervliet Jr./Sr. High School plans to offer the courses as described in this curriculum guide during the 2018-19 school year. Some courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment, scheduling problems or budget constraints.

Additionally, Regents exam and diploma requirements are subject to change based on Board of Regents decisions. Please contact your guidance counselor, or visit the New York State Education Department’s website for the most up-to-date graduation requirements.

The mission of the Watervliet City School District is to “Inspire, Educate and Challenge Every Student, Every Day.”

A message from Principal Ryan Groat

Academic choices students make during their high school years help define interests, expectations and future trajectory for college and careers. To prepare for the rigors of college and today’s highly competitive workforce, Watervliet educators and administrators strongly encourage all students to challenge themselves every day by pursuing a full course load throughout their high school years and by enrolling in college-level and honors courses.

Additionally, students are encouraged to develop their talents through a healthy balance of academics and extracurricular opportunities. Participation in sports, music, character education and other programs outside the classroom help build important life skills including time management, communication, teamwork, and more. Extracurricular participation also builds students’ resumés, which may increase their chances of being accepted at the college or university of their choice. Together, students and their parents must reflect on the strengths and interests of the student, while also considering teacher recommendations.

This course guide describes the academic programs offered at Watervliet Jr./Sr. High School. It is updated annually to reflect changes or additions to the school curricula. Students and parents are encouraged to take time to review the choices and options for study. School guidance counselors will assist in reviewing each student’s academic record to ensure that the appropriate courses are selected.

In addition, faculty and administrators are available to assist in these important decisions and can help answer any questions parents or students may have.

REQUIREMENTS & POLICIES

INTRODUCTION

Planning a program of study for each of the four years of high school is one of many important decisions students must make. In this decision-making process, students are encouraged to use the advice and counsel of their parents, counselors and teachers, as well as students who have preceded them at Watervliet Jr./Sr. High School.

SELECTING A COURSE OF STUDY

Prior to entering grade 9, each student will meet with the junior high counselor to select courses for their freshman year. In each subsequent year, students will meet with their high school counselor to review and plan the next year’s program.

Parents are also expected to review their child’s progress. They are provided a written copy of the child’s tentative schedule for the next academic year during the summer. If conflicts in scheduling develop, students will able to communicate in person or via email with their counselors, so that alternate courses may be selected. Parents and students are reminded that individual subject offerings may vary from year to year as circumstances warrant necessary changes.

Many courses have stated prerequisites, which must be met before a student can be enrolled in that particular course. Prerequisites are determined through experience over several years and are established to aid students in selecting courses in which they have reasonable assurance of success. The Department Chair may give permission for a student to take a course where adequate grounds exist for the student not having met the prerequisite and in the opinion of the Department Chair, where there is a reasonable likelihood that the student will be successful in the course.

HOMEWORK

It is expected that teachers will assign homework and students will complete daily homework tasks. It is expected that students study and/or complete homework for at least one hour each night. Completing homework offers an opportunity to practice independently and strengthen home skills.

GRADE REPORTING

Quarterly mark encompasses general effort, participation/attendance in class (at least 20% of quarterly grade), assignments, tests, quizzes and projects.

Computing course grades:

Full year course grade computation: quarterly marks equal 20% of final average. Regents exam and Common Core exam scores will count as students’ final exam score. Midterm exam equals 5% of final average. Final exam equals 15% of final average. Minimum mark for the first quarter is a 50%. There is no minimum mark for the other three quarters. The actual grade is assigned for remaining three quarters. Midterm exams are required at the end of the second quarter and shall be based on the first 20 weeks of school. Final exam marks are to be the exact mark received. Students cannot be exempt from a Regents exam.
20% (1st quarter) + 20% (2nd quarter) + 5% (MT) + 20% (3rd quarter) + 20% (4th quarter) + 15% (final) = 100% Final course mark

Semester course grade computation:
Each quarter will be counted as 40% of the grade. The final exam will count as 20%. Final exam marks are to be the exact mark received.
40% (quarter) + 40% (quarter) + 20% (Final) = 100% Semester course grade.

Passing grade is 65% in grades 7-12. However, New York State has made significant changes to the proficiency levels for both English language arts and math. To be considered college and career ready, the state suggests students achieve an 80% or higher in math course work and 75% or better in English language arts.

HONOR AND HIGH HONOR ROLLS

Grade level high honor and honor rolls are established each marking period. To qualify for the high honor roll, a student must have an average between the ranges of 89.45–100. To qualify for the honor roll, a student must have an average between the ranges of 84.45–89.44.

THE COLLEGE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM

In order to provide qualified high school students an opportunity to acquire college credit, many courses have been developed in collaboration with local colleges. To participate in a College in the High School course, students must be enrolled as an 11th or 12th grader.

The following courses participate in our College in the High School Program:

  • HVCC Short Fiction (3 credits
  • HVCC Poetry (3 credits)
  • HVCC Contemporary Novel (3 credits)
  • HVCC African American Literature (3 credits)
  • HVCC U.S. History & Government (6 credits)
  • HVCC Government & Politics (3 credits)
  • HVCC Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)
  • HVCC Elementary Statistics (4 credits)
  • SCCC Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
  • HVCC Calculus (4 credits)
  • HVCC Business Communication (3 credits)
  • HVCC Spanish IV (3 credits)
  • HVCC Digital Imaging (3 credits)
  • HVCC Computer Aided Design (4 credits)
  • DL HVCC Psychology (3 credits)
  • DL HVCC Sociology (3 credits)

Advantages to enrolling in the College in the High School Program:

  • Students can earn college and high school credit for successfully completing the courses.
  • Students may fulfill first-year courses required for college graduation.
    The cost of a college education could be reduced depending on the college and the student’s plans.
  • The tuition for each course varies between $150-200 ($50 per credit hour). However, students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch may be eligible for a scholarship that would help cover the cost of the course.

ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS)

Watervliet High School has developed an AIS plan consistent with New York State regulations. Students are provided AIS if they have not yet passed a Regents exam required for graduation (English, Living Environment, Earth Science, Global History, US History, Integrated Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2); have scored a level 1 or 2 on the ELA, math, social studies, or science eighth grade assessments; or need extra support to supplement a core course. Participation in AIS is mandatory for students who meet the above criteria.

Course Load Requirements & Promotion

ALL STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN 5 FULL-TIME COURSES + PHYSICAL EDUCATION.

Promotion in grades 9 through 12 is determined by the number of units of credit students earn at the end of each school year.

  • Students must successfully pass each subject area in grade 8 for promotion to grade 9.
  • Students must earn 5 credits for promotion to grade 10
  • Students must earn 10 credits for promotion to grade 11
  • Students must earn 15 credits for promotion to grade 12

Course & Testing Requirements

REGENTS DIPLOMA

Required Courses

English (4)
Social Studies (4)
Math (3)
Science (3)
Foreign Language (LOTE) (1)
Art/Music (1)
Health. (0.5)
Physical Education (2)
Electives (3.5)
TOTAL CREDITS: minimum of 22

TESTING REQUIRED FOR REGENTS DIPLOMA

(passing score-65)
Common Core English Regents Exam
Global History and Geography
Regents Exam
U.S. History and Government Regents Exam
Common Core Algebra Regents Exam
One Science Regents Exam

Students who earn a 90 average or above on required exams will earn a “Regents with Honors” endorsement.

ADVANCED REGENTS DIPLOMA

Required Courses

English (4)
Social Studies (4)
Math (3)
Science (3)
Foreign Language (LOTE) (3)
Art/Music (1)
Health (0.5)
Physical Education (2)
Electives (1.5)
TOTAL CREDITS minimum of 22

TESTING REQUIRED FOR ADVANCED REGENTS DIPLOMA

(passing score-65)
Common Core English Regents Exam
Global History and Geography Regents Exam
U.S. History and Government Regents Exam
Common Core Algebra, Common Core
Geometry AND Common Core Algebra 2
Regents Exams
Two Science Regents Exams
Students who earn a 90 average or above on required exams will earn a “Advanced Designation with Honors” endorsement.

For more information about NYS graduation requirements, visit the State Education Department website

Pivot Freshman Seminar

LENGTH: Full year course
CREDIT: 1 elective credit
PREREQUISITE: First-time freshman

All grade 9 students are expected to participate in the Pivot Program. This course is designed to provide 9th grade students with the skills needed to successfully complete high school and face the challenges of career/college/work. The Pivot Program meets four days per week, Monday-Thursday.

Students attend classes that include practicing “soft skills” (public speaking, communication, working in groups, etc.), learning about career pathways and options, and increasing skills in reading, writing and math. Students also attend eight career talks per semester, complete one career shadow experience and attend two college visits over the course of the year. At the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Identify their strengths as a student and create goals to further their growth.
  • Research the importance of college and careers.
  • Understand the requirements, as well as the pros and cons of at least 16 occupations.
  • Demonstrate how to present information to others in several formats.
  • Effectively communicate with others both orally and in writing.
  • Understand group dynamics and work effectively with a group to complete a task.
  • Demonstrate good writing by supporting a thesis with evidence.
  • Understand the academic requirements for at least one college and/or career that he or she wants to pursue.
  • Use efficient organizational skills to complete projects in a timely manner.
  • Master basic math skills.
  • Write a resume.

PUPIL SERVICES

The pupil services department includes counseling services, health services, psychological services, speech therapy and special education. It should be noted that except in instances where the physical safety of the students is involved or where the commission of a crime is involved, students shall have the right to enter into privileged communication with their counselor, social worker, the school psychologist, the school physician or school nurse.

SCHOOL COUNSELOR

The primary objective of the guidance counselor is to aid students in their development of a responsible approach to decision making. Each grade level presents specific challenges to students, and the guidance program is therefore designed to provide appropriate supports for students in assisting them to meet these challenges. Counselors provide assistance to students in understanding their educational strengths, in making realistic college/career choices and in making decisions in areas of personal concern. Through parent meetings and individual conferences, counselors attempt to involve parents in their student’s educational and vocational planning.

High School Counselors are assigned to students on an alphabetical basis

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST

The school psychologist acts as a consultant advocate for students in a wide variety of educational and social adjustment domains. In addition, this individual may act as a resource and provide information on community specialists, agencies and available programs.

Students who wish to utilize the service of the school psychologist may make an appointment in the school psychologist’s office or through the Guidance Office. Parents, teachers and others may also request that the psychologist have contact with a particular student.

SOCIAL WORKER

School social workers are trained mental health professionals with a degree in social work who provide services related to social, emotional and life adjustment to school and/or society. School Social Workers are the link between the home, school and community in providing direct as well as indirect services to students, families and school personnel to promote and support students’ academic and social success.

HEALTH SERVICES

An experienced health staff consisting of a school physician and school nurse is available to students. A physical appraisal is required for all 10th grade students. In addition, students competing in athletics or applying for working papers must receive a physical examination by a physician. Students who have specific concerns about any aspect of their physical health are encouraged to meet with a member of the health services staff.

ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE (ENL)

Students identified as English as a New Language Learners (ENL) are expected to achieve the same standards-based goals established by the Board of Regents for all students. In accordance with the Commissioner’s Regulation Part 154, ENL who score below specified levels on the NYSESLAT exam shall receive language proficiency and academic support services based on designated units of study and provided though integrated instruction in content area courses and standalone English as a New Language (ENL) classes.

SPEECH/LANGUAGE THERAPY

Qualified students who require help to improve their speech may take advantage of this service. Meeting on a regular basis with a speech/ language therapist provides the opportunity to gain self-confidence and to correct any problems that make it difficult for the student to communicate clearly with others.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special Education is available to students with disabilities upon completion of an appropriate evaluation, program visitation by parent, student and staff, consultation with parents, approval by the building Pupil Service Team, the District Committee on Special Education, the Board of Education and the parents. Based on the educational needs of the student, the following options are available: Resource Area, Academic Skills Class and Consultant Teacher Services.

Resource Room is for students who participate in mainstream classes at least 50% of the day and require academic support in the areas of reading, math, and/or language arts.

Students who require instruction in the academic areas within a special education class, but who can successfully function in special areas and nonacademic classes may participate in Academic Skills Classes.

Consultant Teacher Services support is provided to students who are mainstreamed 100% of the day that require support from a special education teacher, but who do not need a special education program.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS

A cumulative record (K-12) for each student enrolled at Watervliet Jr./Sr. High school is maintained by the School Counseling Department subject to specified Board of Education Policy and approved administrative regulations.
Students, by appointment with their counselors, are entitled to receive an interpretation of all information contained in their records. Parents, or persons in parental roles, are also authorized to review, by appointment, their child’s record as well and receive an interpretation of it from appropriate school personnel. However, no third party including peace officers, lawyers, or agents shall be permitted access to information contained in any student’s record without the expressed written permission of the person in a parental relationship to the student or the written permission of a student eighteen years or older.

ART

ART 7

10 week, ¼ unit

In grade 7 art, students creatively express themselves through various forms of media. Students produce art work using the elements of art (line, color, shape, form, value, texture, and space). PREREQUISITE: None

ART 8

10 week, ¼ unit

In grade 8 art, students improve upon artistic skills as they explore a variety of media using the elements of art (line, color, shape, form, value, texture, and space). The principles of design are also introduced. PREREQUISITE: None

STUDIO ART

1 year, 1 credit

This one-year foundation course introduces students to the Elements of Art and Principles of Design while developing drawing skills and painting techniques. Studio experiences in the classroom will give students opportunities to experience a variety of media (pencil, pen, ink, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, and tempera paint) while developing student’s individual style and creative problem solving skills. Students will demonstrate their ability to respond, to analyze and to interpret their own artwork and the work of others through discussions, critiques, and writings. PREREQUISITE: None

ADVANCED STUDIO ART

1 year, 1 credit

A one year, advanced level course in drawing and painting with an emphasis on developing a greater depth of understanding of art and application of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design to their work in a variety of media. Studio experiences include drawing, painting, illustration, and printmaking projects. Each student will demonstrate progress over time by developing a body of work and organizing a portfolio. PREREQUISITE: Studio Art

PAINTING

½ year, ½ credit

This half year course will focus on the fundamentals of painting. Emphasis will be placed on color theory and exploration. Students will work in tempera and acrylics while learning and experimenting with many techniques. A range of subject matter will be explored including: still life, landscape, figures, non-objective and imaginative images. PREREQUISITE: Studio Art

ADVANCED PAINTING

½ year, ½ credit
The goal of this half year course is to further techniques and develop a painting style, building upon knowledge acquired from execution of the paintings. Watercolor techniques and projects will be added to the media previously explored in Painting. PREREQUISITE: None

HVCC DIGITAL ARTS (DART)

1 year, 1 credit
This full year course deals with controlling computer technology to produce an artistic image. Students will learn computer illustration techniques, image manipulation, graphic design visual literacy, and the principles and elements of art in composition. The software used is Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator (CS6). PREREQUISITE: None

DRAWING

½ year, ½ credit
This half year course introduces the student to basic drawing materials, techniques and skills. An emphasis is placed on developing the ability ‘to see’, to focus on the observation of three-dimensional forms and translate this to the two-dimensional picture plane. Students work on a variety of exercises and assignments designed to enhance this process. This involves working from still-life and the model. Basic approaches include mark-making, line quality, value, volume, toning, texture and the various methods that emphasize spatial qualities. Compositional strategies are also covered. Students explore the usage of drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, pen, brush/ink, pastel and color. PREREQUISITE: Studio Art

ADVANCED DRAWING

½ year, ½ credit
This half year course continues the exploration discussed above in 2-D drawing and begins the exploration into 3-D art. PREREQUISITE: Drawing

BUSINESS

COMPUTER 8

10 weeks, ¼ unit
Students will develop knowledge of all Microsoft Applications (Excel, PowerPoint, and Word). Students will also learn how to use the Internet as a search engine. In addition, students will perform a number of hands-on assignments that will test their knowledge and research skills. PREREQUISITE: None

CAREER & FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1 year, 1 credit
The purpose of this full-year course in Career and Financial Management (“CFM”) is to provide students the opportunity to learn about the features of our economy, explore a variety of careers, learn the skills and competencies needed for success in the workplace, begin to become financially literate and learn about the many skills that will be needed in real life. Students will gain knowledge about many of the financial functions and skills that will affect their future. They will also learn how the concepts associated with economies, jobs/careers and finance are all linked together. Note: This course is required for a business or vocational sequence. PREREQUISITE: None

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

1 year, 1 credit
This course will encompass the process of owning your own business.
Students will investigate products and services to sell, determine target markets and learn how to market a business. Other topics include forms of ownership, use of technology, financing, employee management, meeting ethical and social obligations and creating a business plan. Course evaluations are based on writing about current trends in business, multistage computer projects, case studies and classroom discussions. A strong knowledge of MicroSoft Word is recommended. PREREQUISITE: 10th – 12th grade students

ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING

1 year, 1 credit
This course introduces students to the exciting and important role that marketing plays in our world. Content revolves around basic marketing functions that are applied to real-life business activities in the entertainment industry. Although students are given the opportunity to refine entry-level employment skills, the course focuses on more advanced career-sustaining skills associated with employment in a marketing – related field. Students will enjoy a wide range of projects that allow them to use their imagination and creativity to develop a business’s popularity through marketing. PREREQUISITE: 10th – 12th grade student

BUSINESS MATH AND PERSONAL FINANCE

1 year, 1 credit
This one-year course is a review of basic arithmetic fundamentals and their applications to financial interactions. The course introduces many topics including checking accounts, savings accounts, loans, credit cards, interest, stocks, bonds, taxes, payroll, inventory, mortgages, depreciation, and insurance. This course may be used as a business course or a third or fourth year of mathematics credit. PREREQUISITE: Two credits of Math

SPORTS MANAGEMENT

1 year, 1 credit
This one-year course looks at the diverse and expanding field of sports and recreation. The course provides a comprehensive look at the basic organizational structures found in the sports industry. Course topics include personnel, programs, marketing, media, financial management and an overview of career possibilities in this growing field. PREREQUISITE: 10th – 12th grade student

CAREER EXPLORATION INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (CEIP)

1 year, 1 credit
The Career Exploration Internship Program is a non-paid, one credit (1) internship consisting of (108) internship observation hours. This course offers students in their senior year a link between school and the workplace. The year-long program will provide students with a hands-on opportunity to experience and work in occupations and careers of interest. The course will consist of in-class work and an internship experience in a career of the student’s choice. The CEIP program helps prepare students to succeed in the workplace and meet the changing needs of employers and the community through the coordination of three primary categories; school-based learning, work-based learning and connecting activities. PREREQUISITE: Course offered to 12th grade students only.

HVCC BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS

1 year, 1 credit
This course offers students an opportunity to become familiar with the written, verbal and non-verbal communication techniques applied in business situations. It will provide students with tools to enhance their overall communication style, including oral, written and listening skills. It will require students to work with and design specific types of written and verbal communication forms and use graphic aids to enhance visual communication. In addition, students will prepare resumés, practice interviewing techniques, create group projects and design and perform oral presentations. PREREQUISITE: None

ENGLISH

ENGLISH 7

1 year, 1 unit
This course involves the study of literature, including short stories, poetry, novels and drama. The class includes treatment of all areas of reading, writing, listening, grammar, spelling and vocabulary. Practice in the writing process, from sentence structure to the building of the complete paragraphs and compositions, are also included. Projects and research are part of the program. Students take the 7th grade English Language Arts Exam in January. PREREQUISITE: English 6

ENGLISH 8

1 year, 1 unit
This course involves the study of literature, including short stories, poetry, novels and drama. The class includes treatment of all areas of reading, writing, listening, grammar, spelling and vocabulary. Intensive practice in the writing process, from paragraph to complete essays, is also included. A variety of projects and research are also part of the program. All students are prepared for the 8th grade English Language Arts Exam that is required by the State of New York in January of the school year. PREREQUISITE: English 7

ENGLISH 9 (ADV. ENGLISH 8)

1 year, 1 credit
The English 8 Advanced section accelerates capable eighth graders to ninth grade English, effectively bypassing the “regular” eighth-grade curriculum. Much more independent work is assigned than in the other eighth grade English classes, and expectations are higher. The students will still be taking the CCLS NYS eighth grade ELA assessment in the spring, and some class time will be devoted to preparing for this important assessment. English 8 Advanced students should have demonstrated above average competence in the skills of writing and reading comprehension, are intrinsically motivated to excel at academics, and are seeking a more challenging learning experience
through enrichment activities. PREREQUISITE: The student must have and maintain an 85% average and/or the recommendation of the teaching staff. Students will be awarded 1 high school English credit.

ENGLISH 9

1 year, 1 credit
In English 9, students read a variety of genres, including novels, nonfiction, poetry, short stories, and drama, and make evidence-based analyses and claims. English 9 features an array of reading and writing strategies, as well as a variety of writing tasks, including a research paper. Preparation for the CCLS English Language Arts Regents exam begins.
PREREQUISITE: None

ENGLISH 10 (ADV. ENGLISH 9)

1 year, 1 credit
The English 10 Honors program consists of intensive reading and writing dealing with various genres of English Literature. Short stories, Shakespearian dramas, Greek mythology, novels and various literatures from around the world are introduced and explored in depth. Authors as diverse as Jackson, Kerouac, Golding, Saki, Weisel; as well as up-and coming writers from Eastern Europe, Africa and Ireland are explored.

This literature will correspond to the Global Studies program that tenth grade students concurrently study in their social studies course. Critical thinking, written assignments and all testing will coordinate with the New York State English Language Arts assessment. PREREQUISITE: 85% average or better in English 9 and/or recommendation of the teacher.

ENGLISH 10

1 year, 1 credit
English 10 involves the study of major world literature including drama, novels, poetry and short stories. The course will include a variety of writing experiences as an outgrowth of the literature read and analyzed in class. Supplemental material will be introduced to develop advanced skills in reading comprehension and writing. Preparation for the English Language Arts Regents exam continues. PREREQUISITE: English 9

ENGLISH 11 (ADV. ENGLISH 10)

1 year, 1 credit
This course involves the study of American literature. There is an inclusion of more challenging literary selections as well as an increase in the number of writing tasks. Works from 17th through 20th century authors encompass all genres. Authors like Poe, Lee, Twain, Faulkner, and Capote are explored. Additionally, there is extensive preparation for the New York State English Language Arts assessment. This program should only be selected by students who have demonstrated a strong work ethic, have an above-average competence in the skills of reading and writing and desire a more challenging learning experience.
PREREQUISITE: 85% average or better and/or the recommendation of the teacher.

ENGLISH 11

1 year, 1 credit
English 11 involves the study of American Literature. Selections from 19th and 20th century authors include drama, novels, poetry and short stories that reflect both historical and modern American life. The course will include a variety of writing experiences based on the literature studied. Supplemental materials will be used to help further develop advanced writing and reading comprehension skills. The English Language Arts Regents exam is taken at the end of the year. PREREQUISITE: English 10

HVCC ENGLISH 12 (ADV. ENGLISH 11)

1 year, 1 credit
The English 12 “College in the High School” program is divided into two semester-long courses (1/2 credit per course) following the Hudson Valley Community College calendar. The first semester course called “Contemporary Novel” looks at novels and films and how these stories relate to contemporary life. Authors such as Yolen, O’Brien Esquivel, and Golden are studied. The second semester course focuses on “African American Literature” offering students an opportunity to not only read great works of literature by authors of color, but also enter into the experiences of struggle, faith, success, failure and prejudice within the context of critical examination of texts. Furthermore, this course will validate a larger cultural context and avenue for understanding this body of material. PREREQUISITE: 85% or better average and/or the recommendation of the teacher. Note: For a fee, students are able to earn a total of six college credits from HVCC upon successful completion of the course.

ENGLISH 12

1 year, 1 credit
English 12 is the culmination of high school ELA studies. Highlights of English 12 include a study of literature as a vehicle for social change (We Regret to Inform You…), a study of the influential power of suggestion (Shakespeare’s Macbeth), the Vietnam War era in literature (O’Brien’s The Things They Carried), and an exploration of the horror genre through short stories (various authors). English 12 focuses on building strong literacy skills that allow students to become knowledgeable, critically-thinking, and active members of our society. PREREQUISITE: English 11

HVCC ENGLISH 12 COLLEGE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL

1 year, 1 credit
The English 12 “College in the High School” program is divided into two semester-long courses (1/2 credit per course) following the Hudson Valley Community College calendar. The first semester course called “Creative Writing: Short Fiction” looks at examples of works of short fiction and evaluates a writer’s style, purpose, and use of literary devices. Students are required to create and submit a series of original writings in a portfolio. The second semester course focuses on “Creative Writing: Poetry and Song,” where students investigate an author’s style, purpose, and use of literary devices as related to poetry and song. Students are required to create and submit a series of original writings in a portfolio. PREREQUISITE: 85% or better average and/or the recommendation of the teacher. Note: For a fee, students are able to earn a total of six college credits from HVCC upon successful completion of the course.

HEALTH

HEALTH 7/8

10 weeks, ¼ unit
This course is prevention-orientated and based on the needs of the community. The program promotes health in a continually changing world through the acquisition of attitudes, understanding, skills and problem solving strategies. Also, the development of social, physical, intellectual and emotional dimensions of health should lead students to appreciate and interact with individuals and their environment. During the course, the students will be expected to attend guest speaker lectures, complete class assignments satisfactorily, participate in class on a regular basis and have a passing grade.

HEALTH

1 year, ½ credit
This course is prevention-orientated and based on the needs of the community. The program promotes health in a continually changing world through the acquisition of attitudes, understanding, skills and problem solving strategies. Also, the development of social, physical, intellectual, and emotional dimensions of health should lead students to appreciate and interact with individuals and their environment. During the course, the students will be expected to participate in field trip experiences, peer education opportunities, attend guest speaker lectures, complete class assignments satisfactorily, participate in class on a regular basis, complete midterm and final exams with a passing grade of 65 or better. PREREQUISITE: None

HOME & CAREERS

HOME AND CAREERS 7

10 weeks, ¼ unit
The Home and Careers course is designed to prepare students for the world of work and managing their own affairs, including money management, nutrition, household responsibilities and parenting. In addition to learning the skills needed for success, students will be expected to demonstrate these skills through class discussions written assignments, and hands-on activities. PREREQUISITE: None

HOME AND CAREERS 8

½ year, ½ unit
This valuable course teaches students lifetime skills in the areas of personal development, relating to other people, and career exploration. Group activities, lab work and independent study will provide opportunities to learn in a variety of settings with a focus on applying new skills to students’ daily lives. PREREQUISITE: None

FOOD AND NUTRITION

½ year, ½ credit
In this fast-paced course, students will expand their basic food knowledge, nutritional awareness, and meal management skills. In addition to reading about and discussing the latest trends and topics in nutrition, students will have numerous opportunities to prepare and taste a variety of dishes. PREREQUISITE: None

GOURMET FOODS

½ year, ½ credit
This wonderful class expands upon ideas presented in the Food and Nutrition class. Students will be encouraged to display initiative and creativity in meal creation in a number of labs. The class culminates with an opportunity to design your own restaurant and prepare items from your menu. PREREQUISITE: Food and Nutrition

LANGUAGE

All students are required to enroll in a minimum of two years instruction in a second language to graduate. Students at Watervliet Jr./Sr. High School complete the first year of this two-year sequence in grades 7-8 (Spanish and French classes at the junior high level meet every other day) and the second year in grade 9. To earn a Regents diploma, students must successfully complete level I language study. Students pursuing an Advanced Regents diploma must complete three credits in a foreign language.

INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH

Fall, ¼ unit
This course consists of 10 weeks each of Spanish and French for the first semester in seventh grade. This class meets every other day opposite physical education class. Each student with their parent/guardian must decide at the end of this course which language to take for the rest of junior high and high school.

GRADE 7 MODERN LANGUAGE

FRENCH
SPANISH

Spring, ¼ unit
This course introduces language on a very elementary and introductory level. The student learns greetings, expressions, numbers, days, months and practices oral situations and conversations in the home and the family.

GRADE 8 MODERN LANGUAGE

FRENCH
SPANISH

1 year, ½ unit
This course is a continuation of the seventh grade curriculum Students are exposed to additional vocabulary and grammar concepts. Students will further their studies in each of the main areas of foreign language learning: speaking, listening, reading, writing and culture. PREREQUISITE: Grade 7 Modern Language

MODERN LANGUAGE LEVEL 1

FRENCH
SPANISH

1 year, 1 credit
This course is the continuation of the first year of language study in the junior high school. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed. Special emphasis is placed on conversational skills and grammatical concepts, such as subject/verb agreement, noun/adjective agreement and word order, and possessive adjectives. Culture is studied within the framework of these skills. PREREQUISITE: Grade 8 Modern Language

MODERN LANGUAGE LEVEL 2

FRENCH
SPANISH

1 year, 1 credit
This full-year course is intended for students who have successfully completed Modern Language Level 1. It focuses on oral and written proficiency while building on the basic grammatical concepts learned in French I. Students will gain a deeper understanding of verbs in the past tense and their applications. Cultural understanding is reinforced through authentic materials. PREREQUISITE: Modern Language Level 1

MODERN LANGUAGE LEVEL 3

FRENCH
SPANISH

1 year, 1 credit
This full-year course is intended for students who have successfully completed Modern Language Level 2. It focuses on improving skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language. More complex grammatical concepts will be introduced, including the use of the future and conditional tenses, as well as the subjunctive tense. Students will be exposed to a variety of cultural topics in addition to current event studies through authentic news reports and newspapers. PREREQUISITE: Modern Language Level 2

MODERN LANGUAGE LEVEL 4/HVCC SPN 200

SPANISH

1 year, 1 credit
This full-year college-level course is intended for those who have successfully completed Modern Language Level 3/Spanish with proficient grades. It is designed to strengthen students’ knowledge of the language through review and practice of previously-learned structures as well as through the study of advanced grammatical concepts. Students will earn 3 college credits through Hudson Valley Community College upon the completion of this course. PREREQUISITE: Modern Language Level 3/Spanish

MATHEMATICS

Our mathematics program provides students with the mathematical knowledge and skills necessary to function in the world. The goal is for our students to develop the ability to:

  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  3. Construct viable arguments of and critique the reasoning of others.
  4. Model with mathematics.
  5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
  6. Attend to precision.
  7. Look for and make use of structure.
  8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Graphing Calculators and materials:

It is recommended that students purchase their own calculators and materials required on the New York State Math Regents examinations. The TI–84 (Plus or Plus Silver Edition) is recommended for student use. The TI–84 will be used for classroom demonstrations.

MATH 7

1 year, 1 unit
The focus of this rigorous course is on four critical areas: (1) Analyzing proportional relationships and using them to solve real-world mathematical problems. (2) Applying and extending previous understandings of fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. (3) Using properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions and solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. (4) Using random sampling to draw comparative inferences involving multiple populations, and investigating chance processes and develop, use and evaluate probability models. In the spring of the seventh-grade year, students will take the NYS 7th grade math assessment. PREREQUISITE: Math 6

MATH 7 ADVANCED

1 year, 1 unit
This rigorous course uses many of the materials from Math 8 to deliver an enriched version of the course. Students must maintain defined minimum grade levels to remain in this level. For a description, see Math 8. PREREQUISITE: NYS 5th grade math assessment, teacher recommendation, the results from the IOWA Aptitude test and 6th grade final exam.

MATH 8

1 year, 1 unit
This rigorous one-year course is designed to allow students to use previously studied arithmetic skills in learning algebra. This course will introduce and reinforce the concepts and techniques that are used in developing problem solving skills. Topics for this course will include the number system, expressions and equations, functions, geometry and probability and statistics. In the curriculum there will be a focus on formulating expressions and equations and using mathematical reasoning to simplify and solve them. Also the concept of a function will be introduced and students will use functions to describe quantitative relationships, as well as analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures. In the spring of the eighth-grade year, students will take the NYS 8th grade Math assessment. PREREQUISITE: Math 7

ALGEBRA I

1 year, 1 credit
This is a rigorous full year course that will prepare students for the required NYS Common Core Algebra I Regents examination in June. This course introduces students to algebraic concepts and techniques that are used in developing problem solving and deductive reasoning skills. Topics include solving and graphing equations and inequalities, factoring, quadratics, exponentials, sequences, statistics and functions. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Math 8. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculators is needed for this course.

GEOMETRY

1 year, 1 credit
This is a rigorous full year course that will prepare students for the required NYS Geometry Regents examination in June. The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extent students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of the geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. During the course, students engage in activities devoted to Congruence, Similarity, Right Triangles, Trigonometry, Circles, Geometric Properties with Equations, Geometric Measurement and Dimension, Applying Geometric Concepts in Modeling Situations, Constructions, and Proof. Geometry is meant to lead students to an understanding that reasoning and proof are fundamental aspects of mathematics and something that sets it apart from the other sciences. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra I course and Algebra I Regents exam. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator and a compass are needed for this course.

NON-REGENTS GEOMETRY

1 year, 1 credit
This full-year course meets the criteria for the state’s Geometry curriculum but with more attention to the essential skills of Geometry. The course is intended to be the second course in mathematics for high school students and is meant to employ an integrated approach to the study of geometric relationships. The final examination in the course is a local departmental exam. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra I course and Algebra I Regents exam. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator and a compass are needed for this course.

ALGEBRA II

1 year, 1 credit
This is a rigorous full year course that is designed to prepare students for the NYS Algebra II Regents examination in June. Students will be utilizing the TI-84 graphing calculators in their daily classes. Topics include linear systems in three variables, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and radical functions, probability and statistics, sequences and series, trigonometric functions, trigonometric graphs and identities. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry courses and Regents exams. TI 84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator is needed for this course.

MATH AIS LAB

No credit
This lab offers academic intervention services to two groups of students and will meet on separate rotations. The first group are those students who have not yet taken or have not yet passed the New York State Regents examination in Algebra I, Geometry or Algebra II and who will take the exams in January. The second group are those students whose scores on the 7th and 8th grade math assessments and/or teacher recommendation have indicated that they may require additional support in mastering the material.

HVCC INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

1 year, 1 credit
This course is a review of the principles of algebra and an introduction to trigonometry. Topics include operations with polynomials, first degree equations, special products, factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, quadratic equations, right angle trigonometry, and graphing linear equations. Students who are successful can receive up to 3 HVCC credits. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry courses plus Algebra I Regents exam. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator is needed for this course.

HVCC ELEMENTARY STATISTICS

1 year, 1 credit
This course serves as an introduction to the concepts of data analysis and statistics. Applications will come from a variety of areas. Topics include, but are not limited to, data analysis and summary for both one and two variables, sampling techniques and design of experiments, basic probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. This course is project driven and will include significant use of technology for computations and analysis. Students who are successful can receive up to 4 HVCC credits. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II courses plus Algebra I Regents exam. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator is needed for this
course.

SCCC PRECALCULUS

1 year, 1 credit
This college course is designed to prepare students for learning calculus. The major emphasis is on the concept of functions, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, graphs and applications. Additional topics include conics, matrices, systems of equations, sequences and series, and probabilities. Students who are successful can receive up to four (4) SCCC credits.  PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II courses and Regents exams. TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator is needed for this course.

HVCC CALCULUS

1 year, 1 credit
Calculus is a college level course designed to develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and to provide experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students will be able to find the limit of a function or state that it does not exist using algebra and graphs, compute the derivative of different functions and evaluate definite and indefinite integrals.Additional topics include systems of equations, sequences and series, vectors and polar coordinates. Students who are successful can receive up to eight (8) HVCC credits. PREREQUISITE: PreCalculus TI-84 Plus or Plus Silver Edition graphing calculator is needed for this course.

MUSIC

MUSIC APPRECIATION (GRADE 7 & 8)

10 weeks, ¼ unit
Students will learn the importance of music in their culture, as well as other cultures throughout the world. Through guided listening and discussion, the student will reflect on the role that music plays in his or her life and with the ways it has affected the lives of others throughout history. Besides factual knowledge exploring the evolution of music, the student will learn basic music notation and analysis.

CONCERT BAND (GREY BAND)

1 year, 1 unit (Grade 7 & 8)
1 year, 1 credit (Grade 9) The Grey Band is composed of students in grades 7-9. Students are required to receive one group lesson per week. When the music director deems the student musically proficient, he/she is allowed to participate in the band. Participation in the concert band may fulfill the Regents requirement for one year of music provided that the student has fulfilled the performance requirements of his/her instrument and grade level. The musicians of the Grey Band work on basic music skills while studying grade-appropriate literature. Concert Band musicians also have the opportunity to perform in a variety of instrumental settings, including Jazz Ensemble, Marching Band, and Brass, Woodwind, and Percussion Ensembles. Each student is expected to participate in all performances. PREREQUISITE: Participation in elementary school band or independent lessons

CONCERT BAND (THE GARNET BAND)
1 year, 1 credit

The Concert Band is composed of students in grades ten through twelve. Students is required to receive one 30-minute lesson per week. When the music director deems the student musically proficient, he/she is allowed to participate in the band. Participation in the Concert Band may fulfill the Regents requirement for one year of music, provided that the student has fulfilled the performance requirements of his/her instrument and grade level. The musicians of the Concert Band work on basic music skills while studying traditional and modern literature. Concert Band musicians also have the opportunity to perform in a variety of instrumental settings, including Jazz Ensemble, Marching Band and Brass, Woodwind, and Percussion Ensembles. Each student is expected to participate in all performances. PREREQUISITE: Participation in the Grey Band or audition by director.

MUSIC THEORY

1 year, 1 credit
Music Theory studies the fundamentals of notation, structure of chords, melodic and rhythm dictation and ear training. As preparation for further study in music theory, emphasis will be placed on developing skills in analyzing music by ear and on practicing skills in developing music literacy skills to read and write music, including specific melodic and harmonic elements.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRADES 7-12

1 year, ½ credit
Physical Education is an instructional program contributing to the physical, mental, and social development of all students. The broad instructional phase of the program provides for a vigorous experience in the development of skills, techniques, and knowledge of individual, team and lifetime athletic activities.

This course is required for graduation. Students must pass physical education each of their four years in high school. Students who fail the course must take double classes every semester until they obtain the correct number of credits. Any student who has a medical excuse for the course must have a doctor’s note and it should be handed into the school nurse. That student will then see their physical education teacher to make up the class with a written assignment.

The physical education (PE) program was established by using the accepted learning standards of New York State. They are the following:

  • Personal Health and Fitness – students will have the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical fitness in the areas of cardiorespitory endurance, flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance and body composition.
  • A Safe and Healthy Environment – students will acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment.
  • Resource Management – students will understand and be able
    to manage their personal and community resources.

Activities included in physical education are conditioning, fitness, self-testing activities, daily lifetime activities, and individual and team sports. Also, to promote the social aspects involved, there will be an opportunity to participate in a coeducational atmosphere. PREREQUISITE: None

ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1 year, ½ credit
Adapted physical education is provided for pupils with chronic handicapping conditions, those with social or emotional issues or long-term injuries or accidents. This course develops confidence in the area of building self-esteem and lifetime fitness. We utilize the indoor/ outdoor track and the fitness center. PREREQUISITE: Request from guidance counselor, principal, director of program and pupil services and physical education teacher.

INDEPENDENT PE

1 year, ½ credit
In this course, students are provided written work each quarter, which they must complete. The assignments contain work on fitness, history of different activities and their emphasis on total wellness. PREREQUISITE: Request from guidance counselor, principal and physical education teacher.

SCIENCE

LIFE SCIENCE 7

1 year, 1 unit
This course covers various parts of the living environment curriculum including skills of scientists, the cell as the basic unit of life and cell processes (biochemistry, reproduction, cellular transport, production of energy). The second half of the year covers topics related to human genetics, evolution, the classification of organisms, and human body systems. The emphasis of this course is in-class discussions, hands-on activities, and projects. Classroom instruction also includes the development of organizational, note-taking, study, computer research, scientific methods and group activity skills.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 8

1 year, 1 unit
This introductory course in chemistry and physics provides a foundation for high school level science classes. Students are introduced to physics in the first half of the year with discussion on motion, force, energy, waves, electricity and magnetism. Students are introduced to chemistry the second half of the year with discussion on matter and different states of matter, atomic structure and the Periodic Table of Elements. Classroom instruction also includes the development of organizational, note-taking, study, computer research, scientific methods and group activity skills.
PREREQUISITE: Science 7

SCIENCE 8 HONORS

1 year, 1 unit
This course is a combination of accelerated physical science and introduction of nanotechnology. The first half of the year students study the basics of chemistry and physics. Students design and perform laboratory experiments. The second half of the year, students are introduced to nanotechnology. Activities and labs are designed to inform and educate students about nanotech applications and tools. Classroom instruction also includes the development of organizational, note-taking, study, computer research, scientific methods and group activity skills. PREREQUISITE: Recommendations from Science 7, Honors Math 7 teachers, Jr. High Guidance Counselor and the Principal.

LIVING ENVIRONMENT

1 year, 1 credit
Course content for Living Environment is founded on the concept that the living cell is the basic unit of structure and function of all living things. In order to understand the mechanisms that operate in the cell, and therefore an organism, the study of basic biochemistry is an early course topic. The topic of animal physiology emphasizes a comparison of organisms with a major study of human anatomy and physiology. Comparisons are then made between other animals and plants. Other course topics include genetics, its relationship to reproduction and theories of evolution and ecology. Whenever possible, course topics are related to existing problems of human society such as pollution and disease. Students should expect to do reading assignments, written work and laboratory work. Students will take the Regents exam upon the completion of the course. PREREQUISITE: None
NOTE: A minimum of 1,200 minutes of acceptable lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Living Environment Regents examination.

LIVING ENVIRONMENT HONORS

1 year, 1 credit
This course will cover all of the topics listed in the Living Environment (one-year) course description. In addition, some topics will be explored in more depth and detail. Students should expect to research relevant topics in biology. Students who enroll in this class should be interested in taking additional honors-level science courses in future years. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of the previous year’s science class with minimum final average of 85% and/or recommendation from the previous science educator. NOTE: A minimum of 1,200 minutes of acceptable lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Living Environment Regents examination.

EARTH SCIENCE

1 year, 1 credit
This is a rigorous course which entails five major concepts in Earth Science. Topics covered in the curriculum include: developing and understanding models of earth’s size and shape, geologic processes involved in shaping the Earth, interpreting earth’s geologic history, earth’s position in space, and meteorology including weather and climate. Much of the course is based on student investigations of these topics. Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on problem solving and effective use of the Earth Science Reference Tables. PREREQUISITE: None
NOTE: A minimum of 1,200 minutes of hands on lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Regents Exam. The Regents Exam in Earth Science is the exit exam for the course.

EARTH SCIENCE HONORS

1 year, 1 credit
This course entails all of the curricular concepts of the Regents Earth Science course, but will explore each topic in greater detail. More emphasis will be placed on independent work. Students should expect written work as well as laboratory assignments. Good computer skills are helpful in this course. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of math. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Overall average of 85% and/or the recommendation of the educator.
NOTE: A minimum of 1,200 minutes of hands-on lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Regents Exam. The Regents Exam in Earth Science is the exit exam for the course.

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

1 year, 1 credit
Students who do not plan to study any aspect of science or technology at the college level may elect to take general chemistry rather than Regents level chemistry. There is less emphasis on mathematics and laboratory work in general chemistry. In addition to the basics of atomic structure and bonding theories, general chemistry students learn more about the nature of materials commonly encountered in the home environment, including soaps, detergents and cleaners. Students also learn examples of polymerization reactions conducted at home including use of silicone sealants (caulks), polyurethanes and epoxies. General chemistry allows interested students to explore chemistry in a less intensive environment than Regents chemistry, but this course is not designed to prepare students for college level chemistry. PREREQUISITE: None

CHEMISTRY

1 year, 1 credit
Chemistry is the study of the composition, structure, and properties of matter, the changes that matter undergoes (reactions) and the energy accompanying those changes. Success in Regents Chemistry requires a consistent level of effort and determination. This course is important for all students planning to study any aspect of science or technology at the college level. Topics covered during the year include matter and energy, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, kinetics and equilibrium, acid base theory, redox chemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. The course seeks to develop critical thinking skills including problem-solving strategies, and effective use of information found in reference tables.
PREREQUISITE: Integrated Algebra & one other Regents Science Course
NOTE: A minimum of 1200 minutes of acceptable lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Chemistry Regents examination.

PHYSICS

1 year, 1 credit
This course is a college prep course and a Regents examination will be taken at the end of the year. The following topics will be covered: mathematical equations (math skills in algebra), observations from the physical world, motion, heat, waves, electricity and modern physics. Many of these concepts will be useful for the rest of a student’s life. Students are expected to complete homework assignments and to follow carefully both written and oral instructions in the laboratory work that accompanies this course. Students should expect to complete reading assignments, written work and laboratory work. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Integrated Algebra and one other Regents Science course.
NOTE: A minimum of 1,200 minutes of acceptable lab work must be completed and submitted prior to being eligible to take the Physics Regents examination.

GENERAL PHYSICS

1 year, 1 credit
This is an introduction to physics. It is a non-calculus based physics course but requires a very basic understanding of algebra and some trigonometry. This course will be a “blended” class, meaning that it is a combination of traditional and project-based learning. Topics covered may include: Intro to Motion, Acceleration and Accelerated Motion, Motion in 2D, Newton’s Laws of Motion, Work & Energy, Linear Momentum & Collisions, Rotational Motion & Equilibrium, Gravity & Circular Motion, Temperature & Heat, Thermodynamics, Gases, Liquids & Solids, Oscillations & Waves, Sound, Properties of Light, Reflection & Mirrors, Refraction & Lenses, Interference & Diffraction. PREREQUISITE: None

ASTRONOMY

½ year, ½ credit
This one-semester introductory course in astronomy is designed to provide a non-technical overview of basic astronomy topics. The emphasis for this class is on exploration and creativity. Some topics that will be addressed are: the size and scale of our solar system, galaxy and universe; our sun, our moon and each of our planets; the constellations in our sky; ancient and modern astronomers; the methods scientists use to study distant stars; the birth, life and death of stars; and space exploration missions. PREREQUISITE: None

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

½ year, ½ credit
Environmental science is a one-semester course that will investigate the interaction of humans with the natural environment. Environmental science is interdisciplinary and the issues that are studied are complex and involve multiple fields of study. Topics covered may include: an introduction to Environmental Science, the nature of science, matter and energy, evolution and ecology, and land biomes. PREREQUISITE: None

FORENSICS

½ year, ½ credit
Forensics is a one-semester investigative science and technology course. Students will learn how to observe, collect, analyze and evaluate evidence found at crime scenes. Current topics as well as the history of forensics will be addressed. Topics may include Physical Evidence Analysis, Glass and Soil Analysis, Fingerprint Analysis, Hair and Fiber Analysis, Chemical Analysis and Toxicology, DNA Analysis, and Pathology. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Living Environment.

SOCIAL STUDIES

SOCIAL STUDIES 7

1 year, 1 unit
The 7th grade social studies course is the first part of a two-year
program on the geography and history of the United States from the first Americans through the Civil War. Additionally, students will investigate and study the history of New York State as well as the City of Watervliet. Students will analyze documents and primary sources, research and write analytical papers, document-based questions and thematic essays. All students will also complete at least one research paper utilizing Modern Language Association (MLA) methodology and citations. Students will take a final examination in June.

SOCIAL STUDIES 8

1 year, 1 unit
The 8th grade social studies course is the second year of a two-year American History and Government survey course. Topics include the time period from Reconstruction through the modern day, with an emphasis on developments in American politics, government, technology, culture, the economy and society. Students will be presented with myriad tasks and materials to help them develop and foster a deeper understanding of the United States and its society and institutions. Students are expected to participate in classroom activities as well as completing out-of-class assignments; including assigned readings, comparative and descriptive essays, document-based questions and the completion of creative projects. An emphasis is placed on honing social studies skills with respect to the analysis of primary sources.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Social Studies 7.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY I

1 year, 1 credit
This course is the first of a two-year program that culminates with the New York State Regents Examination in Global History and Geography at the end of 10th grade. Students will study history in a chronological sequence starting with the early civilizations of the Nile River and Fertile Crescent up through the Age of the Enlightenment. The curriculum also places an emphasis on developing social studies skills, where students learn to become self-directed learners, as well as collaborative workers. Students will work with numerous resources; including timelines, charts, graphs, illustrations, maps, and primary and secondary readings. Students will complete numerous thematic and document-based essays, along with creative projects aimed at bringing the coursework to life. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Social Studies 8

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY I HONORS

1 year, 1 credit
While incorporating all the aspects of the Global 9 curriculum, the Global 9 Honors option offers students additional enrichment opportunities and asks participants to engage in more rigorous application of the essential concepts and content of the course. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Social Studies 8
85% overall average and/or recommendation of 8th grade Social Studies teacher.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II

1 year, 1 credit
This course is the second year of a two-year program leading towards the Global History and Geography Regents examination, given in June. This class explores human history from the 1700s and Age of Absolutism to the present day. The course is organized around the themes of cultural and intellectual life, change over time, turning points in history, human rights, political systems, nationalism, nation states and the scientific and technological changes impacting history. Emphasis will be placed on primary and secondary source readings, classroom participation and discussion, and extensive written work in the form of essays and document-based questions. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Global History and Geography I

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II HONORS

1 year, 1 credit
While incorporating all the aspects of the Global II curriculum, the Global II Honors option offers students additional enrichment opportunities and asks participants to engage in more rigorous application of the essential concepts and content of the course. Students electing to take this course should be prepared to deal with subjects in an analytical and interpretive manner with demonstration of these abilities in coursework. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Global History and Geography II
85% overall average and/or recommendation of 9th grade Social Studies
teacher.

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

1 year, 1 credit
This course focuses on American History from the discovery of the Americas to the present day. It also includes an overview of American Government with a focus on the Constitution, the governmental bureaucracy, and key Supreme Court rulings. The course places an emphasis on primary and secondary readings, group activities, document-based questions and research work. The course culminates with the U.S. History and Government Regents examination in June. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Global History and Geography II

HVCC UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

1 year, 1 credit
Similar to its Regents counterpart, this full-year course focuses on the New York State and Common Core Learning Standards in preparation for the U.S. History and Government Regents examination in June. The honors course also provides students the opportunity to obtain college credit from HVCC. It is an extremely challenging course requiring extensive reading, essays, papers, and document-based questions. Students are required to take part in classroom discussions and group activities and must take a final exam in addition to the Regents Examination. PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Global History and Geography II
Students must be recommended by their 10th grade Social Studies teacher.

ECONOMICS

½ year, ½ credit
Economics provides students an overview of macro and micro economic concepts. Units of study include the global and United States economy, globalization, the free enterprise system, labor and business relations, fiscal and monetary policy, as well as personal finance. Students will be pursuing higher-level thinking skills throughout the course and will apply their knowledge on economic simulations, classwork and homework assignments, discussions, group activities, and two research papers utilizing MLA methodology. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of American History and Government

GOVERNMENT

½ year, ½ credit
This course is designed to provide students an in-depth understanding of American politics and government on a local, state and national scale. It is a culminating course that focuses on civics, and the roles and expectations of being a participatory citizen. Students will explore their rights and responsibilities by engaging in the analysis of public policies and issues that are relevant to the students’ lives. Historic and contemporary public policy issues are explored through application of research skills, classwork and discussions, group projects and activities, and the completion of two research papers utilizing MLA methodology. PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of American History and Government

HVCC AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

1 year, 1 credit
This course offers students an in-depth examination of the principles, procedures, institutions and theories of American National Government. This course is an honors alternative to the traditional 12th grade Government class and provides students the opportunity to obtain college credit from HVCC. It is an extremely challenging course requiring extensive reading, essays, papers, document based questions and four research papers utilizing MLA methodology. Students must take part in class discussions, debates, group activities and projects. A final exam is given at the end of the course. PREREQUISITES – Successful completion of American History and Government
Students must be recommended by their American History and Government educator
The course fulfills both NYS graduation requirements for Government and Economics. The first half of the year will be devoted to American National Government, culminating in 3 HVCC credits. The second half of the year will focus on Economics and Economic Decision Making.

TECHNOLOGY

TECHNOLOGY 7

1 year, 1 unit
The goal of this course is to teach students the importance of developing skills and interests in the field of technology. Students will learn how technology affects their every day lives, how to solve problems using technology, the basics of design, electronics/computers and communication, production and transportation systems. The students will gain knowledge of the tools and machinery in the workshop. The students will be expected to maintain a notebook and to complete written and hands-on assignments and activities.

DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION

1 year, 1 credit
The focus of this course will be developing an idea from conceptualization through prototype development. Students will utilize skills and knowledge previously learned in Technical Drawing and Construction Systems. Using the design production process, students will solve a wide variety of scenario-based problems. Topics that will be covered include: advanced drawing skills, form and function, research, machine and material processes, modeling and finishing techniques. Participants will learn the course content through a variety of classroom activities, classroom discussion and team projects. This course will also cover 1 unit of the high school fine arts requirement. PREREQUISITE: None

HVCC COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

1 year, 1 credit
This basic Computer Aided Design (CAD) course will expose students to CAD terminology, history, components, applications, design functions and careers. The majority of the time spent in this course will consist of using a CAD system to solve graphic problems. Students will be given the opportunity to use the latest in Computer Aided Software, Auto-CAD 2002. PREREQUISITE: Design & Drawing

ENERGY SYSTEMS I & II

1 year, 1 credit
Energy is life. Without energy there would be nothing. It has been theorized that energy is never created nor destroyed, just changed. Throughout this course students will learn about some of the many forms of energy and how humans, plants and animals use it to survive. The class will discuss how energy is converted into useable forms such as heat and electricity. Students will discuss the various ways that plants use this energy to grow. This course also will show students how latent energy can be used to heat homes, power cars and make life easier, all while being efficient and saving the environment. (Course offered every other year) PREREQUISITE: None

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

½ year, ½ credit
Modern civilization is 100% dependent on transportation systems. Without these systems, society would experience a COMPLETE breakdown. Every day millions of tons of food, goods and raw materials are shipped around the country and world for use where needed. Communications and electrical grids also would begin to shut down without refueling and repair. Maintaining these systems is of greatest importance. Course goals: Over 20 weeks, students discuss how transportation systems are designed and integrated into society; how systems are currently fueled and may be powered in the future; and how new and emerging technologies will affect the future of transportation systems. The class will be split into three major modes of transportation: land, sea and air. Each will have its own component and sub-modules containing a lesson, student research and a hands-on project. (Course offered every other year) PREREQUISITE: None

CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS

½ year, ½ credit
This course is designed to give students an overall view of tools, procedures and building codes that may be encountered on a job site. Whether an individual plans to someday build, own or rent a home, it is a good idea to know how systems work and the planning that is involved in selecting the right home to fit each individual’s lifestyle. Through the use of tools, research and hands-on projects, students will learn the process of planning and building a house. (Course offered every other year) PREREQUISITE: None

DISTANCE LEARNING

Watervliet High School has expanded the academic electives* it offers students through the distance learning (DL) service provided by the Northeastern Regional Information Center (NERIC). Distance learning features a secure network that connects classrooms via a state-of-the-art audio-video technology system that allows educators to teach courses to students in other locations simultaneously. This digital network offers a collaborative approach to teaching and learning for teachers and students to interact with each other in real time.

HVCC SOCIOLOGY (FALL)

½ year, ½ credit
This course offers an introduction to the scientific study of human social interaction with emphasis on societies, groups, organizations, social networks and communities as the units of analysis. Topics covered include culture, social structure, socialization, sex roles, groups, and networks, organizations, deviance and social stratification, race and ethnic relations and social institutions. (3 HVCC credits are available at the tuition rate)
PREREQUISITE: None

HVCC PSYCHOLOGY (SPRING)

½ year, ½ credit
This course consists of systematic, empirical study of human behavior. The course covers the following: introduction to psychology, research methodology, biological psychology, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning memory, thought and language, intelligence, human development, motivation and emotion, personality theories, abnormal psychology, health psychology, and social psychology. (3 HVCC credits are available at the tuition rate) PREREQUISITE: None

*Additional course electives may be offered through the distance learning network. The Curriculum Office will work with guidance counselors to share information about additional course options with students as it becomes available.